Last edited by Mezijinn
Thursday, July 9, 2020 | History

6 edition of Compulsory compassion found in the catalog.

Compulsory compassion

a critique of restorative justice

by Annalise E. Acorn

  • 373 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by UBC Press in Vancouver .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Restorative justice.,
  • Justice réparatrice.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementAnnalise Acorn.
    SeriesLaw and society series, Law and society series (Vancouver, B.C.)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHV8688 .A25 2004
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 207 p. ;
    Number of Pages207
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3363755M
    ISBN 100774809426
    LC Control Number2004426310
    OCLC/WorldCa53847123

    Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more. The term "Welfare State" has pleasant connotations. It carries the implication of a deep concern for the welfare of human beings and conveys the impression of a boundless' compassion and a benevolence without limitation. Dr. Palyi, in the first chapter of his book, Compulsory Medical Care and the Welfare State, realistically points out.

    Cite This Article. Horowitz, Carl F. "Compulsory Compassion." The Free Mar no. 4 (April ). Narrative and “Compulsory Compassion” the excitement is about a radical retheorizing of the justice field, and fresh experiments in ways of confronting injustice, confronting concrete problems like crime, war, tort, tax avoidance, or bullying. Philosophically, restorative justice can therefore be seen in the prag-.

      Compassion literally means “to suffer together.” Among emotion researchers, it is defined as the feeling that arises when you are confronted with another’s suffering and feel motivated to relieve that suffering. Compassion is not the same as empathy or altruism, though the concepts are related. While empathy refers more generally to our ability to take the perspective of and feel the. Compulsory Compassion by Annalise E. Acorn, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.


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Compulsory compassion by Annalise E. Acorn Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Compulsory Compassion is the most searching critique of restorative justice to date. It's an eloquently passionate and yet brilliantly and devastingly critical take on some very under―examined assumptions about mercy, compassion, and justice."―Robert Weisberg, Edwin E.

Huddleson Jr. Professor of Law, Sanford UniversityCited by: In Compulsory Compassion, Annalise Acorn, a one-time advocate for restorative justice, deconstructs the rhetoric of the restorative movement. Drawing from diverse legal, literary, philosophical, and autobiographical sources, she questions the fundamental assumptions behind that rhetoric: that we can trust wrongdoers capacity for meaningful accountability and respectful/5.

In Compulsory Compassion, Annalise Acorn, a one-time advocate for restorative justice, deconstructs the rhetoric of the restorative movement. Drawing from diverse legal, literary, philosophical, and autobiographical sources, she questions the fundamental assumptions behind that rhetoric: that we can trust wrongdoers' performances of contrition.

In Compulsory Compassion, Annalise Acorn, a one-time advocate for restorative justice, deconstructs the rhetoric of the restorative movement. Drawing from diverse legal, literary, philosophical, and autobiographical sources, she questions the fundamental assumptions behind that rhetoric: that we can trust wrongdoers' capacity for meaningful accountability and respectful community, and that we.

There is a longstanding difference in how to read the Gospels in relation to criminal justice and in how to read the Gospels in response to issues of violence and nonviolence in general, and dominant Western Christian views of the above.

One of. Compulsory Compassion: A Critique of Restorative justice' is a well-written, com-prehensive, convincing, and well-researched book. Seldom do I have the chance to read legal scholarship that is as fluent and readable as the best fiction out there.

Not surprisingly than, the book takes us in a very organized, yet fascinating, manner. With all of this in mind, Acorn seeks in this book a critical examination of restorative justice.

In particular, she critically assesses Compulsory compassion book claim that restorative justice can successfully bring together the values of love and compassion, on the one hand, and the requirement of justice and accountability, on the other hand. The problems begin with the book's title.

First, to be effective, restorative processes must be and are voluntary, not compulsory. Secondly, at its core, restorative justice is about accountability for wrongful behaviour, not about : Bruce P. Archibald. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Law and Society: Compulsory Compassion: A Critique of Restorative Justice by Annalise Acorn and Annalise E.

Acorn (, Paperback) at the best online prices at eBay. Free shipping for many products. This book is succinct, clear, well-documented, and crucial for helping us to escape the unsustainable, counter-productive 'war on poverty', and to move toward an historically-proven, personally-engaging compassion that unites society as it preserves human dignity, ennobling the giver and receiver by: 1 Book Review of Compulsory Compassion: A Critique of Restorative Justice, Annalise Acorn, Vancouver: UBC Press,pages.

By Wayne Northey Introduction There is a longstanding difference in how to read the Gospels in relation to criminal justice and in how to read the Gospels in response to issues of. "In Compulsory Compassion, Annalise Acorn, a one-time advocate for restorative justice, deconstructs the rhetoric of the restorative movement.

Drawing from diverse legal, literary, philosophical, and autobiographical sources, she questions the fundamental assumptions behind that rhetoric: that we can trust wrongdoers' performances of contrition; that healing lies in a respectful, face-to-face.

Compulsory Compassion is the most beautifully written of the now countless books on restorative justice. It is also the most foundational critique yet to appear. Acorn once was committed to the restorative justice movement, but then became disenchanted. A Critique of Restorative Justice, Annalise Acorn, Vancouver: UBC Press,pages WN: A Christian acquaintance and fellow theological student at Regent College in told me of this book, delighted about such a critique of Restorative Justice, and wondering what I thought.

My response was the review you may click on below. New Testament theologian Christopher Marshall in possibly. Compulsory Compassion - A Critique of Restorative Justice. Often touted as the humane and politically progressive alternative to the rigid philosophy of retributive punishment that underpins many of the world’s judicial systems, restorative justice aspires to a theoretical and practical reconciliation of the values of love and compassion with justice and accountability.

meaning of compassion and its connection to justice – “Just Compassion” The author concludes the book with discussion of a critique of Restorative Justice by legal scholar Annalise Acorn in her book Compulsory Compassion: A Critique of Restorative Justice, Law and Society Series, Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press,   Compulsory Compassion: A Critique of Restorative Justice Vancouver, British Columbia: UBC Press.

She had deep misgivings about criminal justice as commonly conceived and applied; especially, as she puts it, with criminal justice as a 'conflation of justice with punishment as imprisonment – or as any pure infliction of suffering on the wrongdoer.'.

Book Review of Compulsory Compassion: A Critique of Restorative Justice, Annalise Acorn, Vancouver: UBC Press,pages. By Wayne Northey. Introduction. There is a longstanding difference in how to read the Gospels in relation to criminal justice and in how we read the Gospels in response to issues of violence and nonviolence in general.

Compulsory Compassion: A Critique of Restorative Justice. Aimalisc E. Acorn Article in Alberta law review 42(3) February with 74 ReadsAuthor: Bruce Archibald.

Buy Compulsory Compassion: A Critique of Restorative Justice (Law and Society) New Ed by Annalise Acorn (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.5/5(1). Books shelved as compassion: Twelve Steps to a Compassionate Life by Karen Armstrong, Each Kindness by Jacqueline Woodson, 14 Cows for America by Carmen.In Compulsory Compassion, Annalise Acorn, a one-time advocate for restorative justice, deconstructs the rhetoric of the restorative movement.

Drawing from diverse legal, literary, philosophical, and autobiographical sources, she questions the fundamental assumptions behind that rhetoric: that we can trust wrongdoers' capacity for meaningful.

(Gerry Johnstone, author of Restorative Justice: Ideas, Values, Debate) Compulsory Compassion is the most searching critique of restorative justice to date.

It's an eloquently passionate and yet brilliantly and devastatingly critical take on some very under-examined assumptions about mercy, compassion, and justice.5/5(2).